Subscribe

Marketers offer tips on creating great advertisements

Q: What advice would you give to someone looking to open a business here? What’s the first thing they should do to get word out about their business?
A: If you’re looking to start a business in east Idaho, be sure to do your homework. It’s a great place to own a business, and there are hundreds of great examples of business owners that have done it right. They clearly had a vision for what the consumer wanted and what the area may have been lacking. When the decision is calculated and truly fills a niche in the market place, the odds of success are so much higher than those who blindly jump into something. As for marketing, the first thing every business needs is a solid and professional identity. This includes, but is not limited to, your logo, website, business cards and all print materials, just to name a few. Once your identity is in place, a marketing plan as calculated as the initial decision to open your doors is needed. Don’t just start throwing money at various media outlets. Seriously look into where your customers are spending most of their time, where they shop, where they live, where they get their daily entertainment, etc.
— Jeremy Dresen and Holly West, Glacier Marketing

A: First: Budget and plan for your advertising. So many businesses forget about advertising costs during their startup and use all of their money just to get the doors open. Make sure you have enough money to craft a memorable message to announce your arrival and to advertise consistently thereafter. Putting up a sign and creating a Facebook page is not enough. Often, businesses skip the budgeting step and when times are tough, there is no money to make a strong impression and reach your demographic.
Second: Do your internal marketing and planning before you ever create an advertisement. You need to figure out your company’s identity and the audience or segment of the population you are truly serving. Ask what makes you unique and why someone should change their habits to include your product or service in their daily lives. Doing this exercise will ensure that you are advertising in the right media channel to your best potential new customers.
— Lisa Fischbach, MCS Advertising

Q: How can a business with a limited advertising budget get the most bang for its buck?
A: When budgets are limited, you really need to exercise discipline in marketing. It’s easy to get excited about traditional media; radio, TV, billboard, and even print, but reach and frequency are what you’re after regardless of the venue. Only spend what you know your business can afford, and don’t let anyone convince you otherwise. Right now, social media is all the craze because of how cheap it is to boost a post or place an ad. This medium is not without its downfalls though! Its very easy to hide an ad or tell Facebook not to show you a specific ad again. However, for the low cost you can reach a large number of the RIGHT people for very little, if you know what you’re doing. Yes, anyone can boost a post, but making sure it gets in front of the right people with the right interests, and then track those results so you have qualitative data to support your marketing decision is a major upside to using a company like Glacier for your social media marketing.
— Jeremy Dresen and Holly West, Glacier Marketing

A: Guerilla or grassroots advertising is one of the least expensive ways to make an impression, but conversely it takes time and people-power. Sign up for local clubs where like-minded business folks join to network and visit about their businesses like the Chamber, Rotary or Civitan Clubs. Attend meetings, productions and events where you can hand out coupons or free samples. Hire a cheerleading squad to wear t-shirts and ride rollerblades and pass out your crazy best door-busting offer — don’t be afraid to create a spectacle, people will take notice. Put out a side-walk sign and be clever with your specials. Combine all of these efforts with your social media posts on Instagram or Facebook or Twitter etc. Again, figure out what makes you different from every other business in your category and talk about that — these differences make up what is your brand, and the essence of what your business is built upon. When you combine your grassroots efforts with a paid campaign, make sure it all sounds and looks the same, be repetitive and be consistent — pound your unique selling proposition in the ground. If you’re business is the only one open nights and weekends make it known. Oh, and answer the phones, reply to messages/inquiries, have enough staff, and be available when the calls come in; no matter how good your advertising is, it can’t do the work for you.
— Lisa Fischbach, MCS Advertising

Q: If a company feels like their advertising has gone stale, how would you recommend they go about revitalizing it?
A: First off, each year the marketing plan should be evaluated and reviewed prior to beginning again in January(or whenever the budgetary year begins for your business). In addition, each quarter there should be a similar evaluation/review. If things need to be tweaked, do it! While you should stay within the parameters of the campaign or theme that’s been decided on, if things needs to be adjusted, you certainly should do so. Sometimes the response to a certain campaign isn’t what we were hoping. We’ll go in and adjust the media schedules so they’re a little more aggressive over a shorter period of time. Revising ad copy or production is also something we do on a regular basis. We’ve also had to pivot some marketing plans in the past so we’re less active on traditional media and more active and social, and visa-versa. Overall, keeping your message fresh is important. A message, regardless of the advertising medium, becomes way less effective the longer it’s left up or is allowed to continue to run for extended periods of time. Don’t allow your message to become background noise that everyone eventually tunes out!
— Jeremy Dresen and Holly West, Glacier Marketing

A: If sales are stagnant or the market has left you behind, this is when an advertising or marketing firm can really help. An outside professional can help analyze your position in the market and create a media plan and a creative campaign to help you reach your next goal.
— Lisa Fischbach, MCS Advertising

 

Q: What are some of your favorite ad campaigns that you draw inspiration from?
A: If it’s clever, catches my attention in the first 5 seconds, and I can recall it at a later point in time, then I’m a huge fan of it. I don’t have any specific examples of memorable local campaigns outside of the clients we’ve worked with over the years, but I will say this ….my favorite car commercial recently is one for the new Porsche 911. The guy drives some crazy distance just to deliver a note to his boss.Nothing urgent, just a note that could have waited until they were back to work on Monday! The point of course was the fact that you’ll look for any excuse to drive your Porsche 911 Carrera GTS. As a car enthusist. I found myself wanting a Carrera GTS! Getting the consumer to say to themselves, “Yes! I’ve had those same thoughts!” or “I’ve been looking for something that would solve that life-problem!”. Those are the ads that inspire me. The ads that put the customer first, and the product second.
— Jeremy Dresen and Holly West, Glacier Marketing

A: I am inspired every day by local creative, as well as the million dollar ads from mega-agencies. At my firm we make sure to watch and listen for new ideas that make us nod our heads or smile. Even bad ads can inspire us in our daily work. I love the Jack-In-the-Box commercials right now featuring the lady who yells, “We’ve got a craving”!! She makes me laugh every time.
— Lisa Fischbach, MCS Advertising

 

Q: If you could develop an ad campaign for any company in the world, what company/product would it be?
A: I won’t pin-point a specific company here. The auto industry is my passion though. And not just any car company. Preferably one that offers its customers performance cars, like the Nissan GT-R, Lexus LC 500, or Porsche(choose any model). It’s always easier to create something when you’re passionate about it.
— Jeremy Dresen and Holly West, Glacier Marketing

Q: What question do you most frequently hear from clients/potential clients and how do you respond?
A: The question we get the most is how much should I be spending on marketing. It surprises me how many business owners don’t really know or don’t have a manageable budget already established. From our experience, 6-7% of the business gross revenues seems to be a sweet spot for a marketing budget. For a car dealer that does $3 million in sales each year, it would be reasonable for them to spend $180,000/year on marketing. Or a small service oriented business that generates $500,000 a year spending less than $3,000/mo on marketing.
One last comment. Regardless of budget, Glacier can help you and your business establish a budget, a game plan with a good marketing mix, and all of the creative needed, no matter the platform. Traditional media or digital/social. We’re active in every marketing space.
— Jeremy Dresen and Holly West, Glacier Marketing